Bojan Fürst

Posts Tagged ‘heritage’

Corner Stores

In Photography, Print on November 18, 2009 at 12:51 pm

I started photographing corner stores several years ago when I first acquired a Holga camera. A selection of corner store photos has been published in September/October issue of Saltscapes magazine. You can see the whole ever-growing set on Flickr.

Grand Manan, New Brunswick, Canada.

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Villages in Transition

In Photography, Print on May 22, 2008 at 9:00 pm

Posavina horses resting in Lonjsko Polje Nature Park.

Posavina horses resting in Lonjsko Polje Nature Park.

(Published in YouthVision magazine, China)

I arrive at dawn and villagers are already up and working: men and women biking to market with baskets full of fresh cheese and metal pails full of cream; cow herders collecting livestock from yards to take into the fields to graze; old women in black scarfs feeding chickens.

Best known for its feathery residents – white storks who make their home in large nests on the roofs of almost every house in this small Croatian village – Čigoč is also the gateway to one of Croatia’s best kept secrets: Lonjsko Polje Nature Park and marshes.

A large flood area between five rivers in central Croatia (Lonja, Sava, Kupa, Una and Strug) the park is home to some 250 bird species, 500 white and black stork couples and 21 villages.

Recognized internationally as an Important Bird Area, the region’s inhabitants are fighting to preserve their natural and cultural heritage.

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Disappearing Arts

In Photography, Print on May 22, 2008 at 8:52 pm

A man walks by a traditional coppersmith shop in Sarajevo's old Turkish quarter.

A man walks by a traditional coppersmith shop in Sarajevo's old Turkish quarter.

(Published in Toronto Star)

Hazim Numanagić exudes a calmness that permeates his entire studio and slowly spreads to those who step inside. Just around the corner, the bustle and noise of Baščaršija, Sarajevo’s old Turkish quarter is as it always was.

Hazim’s unassuming shop, located in a side street, is completely silent. A small tea pot and two small, narrow glasses are the only indications that he was indeed expecting a visitor. The smell of tobacco spreads throughout the studio as Hazim lights a cigarette and selects a particular piece of reddish reed. On his desk, there is a thick copy of Jalaluddin Rumi’s The Mathnawi and a small Qur’an. Both books are worn, yet cared for – a source of pleasure as much as inspiration.

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